Comment on Thoughts About Prepping from an Ole Fart by m edwards

We Tried to pass on truth and also wholesome living ideas to our kids..We have 5 they range from 19 to 30 and we have a few grand kids as well. Nearly everything that was done to our home or our cars WE DID IT. We also raised gardens and livestock and it was done in a way the kids got to take part. Most of their peers or friends had no such basis of learning. Very few had ever pitched a tent or made a lean-to to sleep under….few had cleaned a fresh caught fish. None had ever planted “Tom’s and Cukes”..nor lived a country style life even if they were not from the city.
The younger generation I see today are very smart..in Tech., but not in common sense…nor do they seem to be as resilient or “durable” as kids from past generations. Give a millennial a hammer and usually he will not know which way to hold it nor does he care to learn…he has the smarts…but it’s just too quaint for him….oh and dirt under the finger nails and sweat down you’re back? FUGETABOUTIT..!

Out of the 5 we have…2 I know will make it….the other 3 I fear for….they don’t see nor do they understand that their Credit Card life could collapse at any moment…their portfolio will be of no use to them.

It is our fault , we should have tried harder but we didn’t.

Comment on Providing Hospital Care in SHTF by Huples

Thanks.
SIRS is beyond lay people. I stick to my original advice to start gram negative if a fever occurs. Frankly who cares? SIRS equals death in shtf.
You are correct about enteric coated aspirin. Good point.
I’m pushing lay people to start antibiotics early. silver dressings and honey are great but get antibiotics in before the gi tract shuts down is reasonable. I can use Ivi antibiotics but most cannot in shtf. Not sure why you’d not do both in shtf at the start. I know we are antibiotic shy these days but shtf is a different animal.
True about external skin traction but worth a go. If not used a bone fracture of the legs long bones if survived means a cripple. Not a good out come in shtf. Improvised works but use paracord, weights, and skin bandages. I’d also learn how to feel for normal bone and joint movement so you can visualize the broken anatomy but I’m guessing that is beyond the scope of most.
The interaction is a vague thing I came upon. If true best avoid. Pick one type and use it. The asthma thing can be true so again why risk it. Use the alt.

Comment on EDC During SHTF and Why “Tacticool” Might Just Get You Killed: Part I by Huples

Hi Bob,
Yes I got the message and it’s a smart one. I meant I hanker to dress as a soldier and have tactical stuff but don’t. I’ve cached a lot of stuff. Problem is I have to assume worst case which is -30c and snow for the 110km hike. Obviously decent sleeping system but I need the Biolite stove and a tent as well or we’d freeze to death. Mre won’t cut it. We’d need lots of hot coffee and tea.
Other than minus 10 and below the trip should be actually fun. Below that I’d rather not do it without a very large pack. We have a sled at home now so I’m think no pack and drag in snow. I’d not bug out in winter unless I had to but it worries me. I always assume worse case so no vehicle can move and roads, towns are impassible for whatever reason.
I’m caching at the Bol. Work in progress as below ground storage in case the place is occupied (unlikely).
In deep snow with packs loaded and snow shoes 2km an hour is good going. It might make more sense for me to go ten km and wait out a thaw in a local forest.
Any makes of large 70l + hiking packs anyone can recommend? The groupon ones are too small

Comment on EDC During SHTF and Why “Tacticool” Might Just Get You Killed: Part I by BobW

I suppose time parameters might be in order to provide needed context to the article. The day after shit goes down, it makes sense to maintain a low profile. Concealed carry makes a lot of sense, but going all ‘National Guard refugee’ is definitely NO GO terrain. Even if a person doesn’t attract real trouble, every scared person is going to come running to find out ‘when they are coming to save us.’

Bottom line, dress for the role. Patrolling the perimeter, camo up. Heading to town on day 2 to secure some last minute supplies (pop tarts of course), dial it down. Look like a scared local trying to hook up some baby formula. An empty hiking pack makes a lot more sense than a weighed down pack. There are always people looking. Look as desperate as everyone else.

Comment on EDC During SHTF and Why “Tacticool” Might Just Get You Killed: Part I by BobW

Huples, there’s a place and purpose for everything, especially camo gear. Seems to me that the author is discussing going out in public right after, not patrolling the property. As for high end hiking gear, think about this…that gear is super sexy, super light, and not super durable. Milspec pants and tops are purpose built to survive the stupid shiz soldiers do in the field. They are hotter than their hiking equalents, mainly to increase survivability in austere environments.

As for packs, honestly, I have both. Big hiking packs for, well, overnight hiking and bugging out. Smaller packs like 5.11’s excellent 24 and 72 packs, old Alice packs, school backpacks, and the like. Each fills a specific task and purpose. For day hiking, i’ll often carry the big 5.11 bag so I can throw fleece and/or rain jackets in them (as well as a firearm if we are in bear country).

Can you cache any of that Canadian winter gear at your proposed BOL?

Comment on EDC During SHTF and Why “Tacticool” Might Just Get You Killed: Part I by BobW

No bumper or window stickers that call out what kind of redneck, liberal, or military moto you are. Keep your business private that way. I drive around here, and see TONS of NRA, F hillary/Obama, and generally political stickers, Military license plates, and the like. My cars are devoid of any political positions. No need to tip anyone off about anything.

If y’all don’t like the concept of the grey man, think of it as counter-intelligence. Don’t give away any information that someone can use against you. If everyone in the diner is wearing camouflage pants but you, you stand out. If everyone’s in skinny jeans, and you’re in 5.11 tac pants, you stand out. Just don’t stand out.

Comment on Seven Tips for a Smart and Healthy Victory Garden by Thoughts About Prepping from an Ole Fart – The Right News Network

[…] Everything we ate had to be grown and preserved off the farm, during the summer. All repairs had to be done on sight, using material at hand, because a trip to town was a half day affair. The closest farm machinery dealer was 9 miles away in Palouse, Washington. I have a degree in Architecture from the University of Idaho; although I spent all of my work life as a test technician in research and development, working for a major truck manufacturer. […]

Comment on Thoughts About Prepping from an Ole Fart by EgbertThrockmorton1

Excellent article. I still(I know I should’nt be) amazed by the sheer stupidity of Sheeple content in their mediocrity.
Nobody is coming to “save us” from ourselves.
My technical repair skills are limited, but I am STILL learning what I CAN do, with what I have on hand tool-wise. Makes me feel far more independent!
I think we grey haired types are often overlooked by the MillenialSheeple, as “useless”, until their world collapses.
Ah, too bad youth is wasted on the young….Inbelieve that is how it goes!

Comment on Thoughts About Prepping from an Ole Fart by christopher

i agree with other posters.. and I have carried my share of 5 gallon buckets of water to flush toilets, cook and bath with & read books by candlelight. I just hope the internet Generation is actually trying to learn something useful on inernet instead of just watching funny videos & kardashians. Once the internet goes down, i think alot of youger people will become useless zombies.

DXing and Why It Is Important

If you have been in the prepping and survival community for a while, you may have heard of a hobby called DXing. This is the practice of receiving or sending long distance radio transmissions and confirming that they were received. These transmissions can be made using AM radio, shortwave radio, VHF radio, or HAM radio. For example, Radio Australia can sometimes be heard in Lansing, MI. The transmission covers a distance of 9835 miles which would never be possible with a standard broadcast. This hobby started in the early days of radio when people would request confirmation of broadcasts by mail to confirm long distance transmissions.

What gives DX transmissions their distance is the practice of refracting the signal off of the ionosphere, sometimes several times in one transmission. This gives the broadcast much more range, but makes it more dependent on conditions. The weather, time of day, the eleven-year sun spot calendar, and even solar storms can greatly affect the success of these transmissions. They must also be sent using low frequencies typically under 50 MHz.

Equipment

DXing equipment can consist of an elaborate system costing thousands of dollars, or it can be conducted using a cheap portable receiver. Just by using an AM radio at night you can listen to stations that are broadcasting from hundreds of miles away. If you wish to listen to broadcasts from several different countries during daytime hours, a cheap shortwave radio can accomplish this. It is only when the distance gets extreme that you need fine-tuned equipment.

Many serious DXers purchase or build equipment to better fit their needs. Their receivers are often specifically designed for long range transmissions and their antennas are often built for a specific frequency. In all reality the inexpensive setups will pick up just as many transmissions as the expensive setups. The difference is the quality of the transmission. With better equipment you can deal with adverse broadcast conditions better. The additional filtering options and interference blockers give you clearer reception.

Another common practice in recent years is called diversity reception. This is when a DXer connects multiple receivers or antennas to a computer. It allows them to make an ‘apples to apples’ comparison on a specific frequency to help them determine which combination of antennas and receivers picks up the best signal. The process allows them to take fine tuning to a whole new level.

Radio Types

AM radio listeners in the 50’s and 60’s often would make their own crystal sets with long wire antennas. Top 40 music was very popular at that time, but many of the AM stations had a limited range. For some people the only way to receive these signals was to fine tune their equipment to receive from longer distances. Many of these stations were not allowed to broadcast at night, so listeners turned to DXing during those hours to pick up their music. The need for this has faded with the use of FM stations for music.

VHF DXing has not been nearly as popular. These signals can be skipped for hundreds or even thousands of miles. Often emergency services will broadcast using VHF and these signals will travel great distances. The vast majority of listeners for this type of broadcast are local, so it is surprising that these signals are sent out over great distances. One of the biggest challenges of DXing over VHF is that broadcasters are not required to identify themselves, so determining the source can be difficult.  This may have lead to the limited use of this medium.

Shortwave DXing started as a way to broadcast internationally during wartime. With the advent of streaming audio through computers, the use of shortwave for DXing has greatly diminished. However, missionaries still use shortwave heavily to reach third world countries whose people often cannot afford computers. Many of these broadcasts are sent out in single band mode so specific equipment is needed to receive it.

Amateur radio is the most popular medium for DXing. Many of these hobbyists will pursue awards from DX clubs and organizations. For example, awards are given out for the number of “entities” that have are confirmed to have been contacted. Entities are used instead of countries because territories and island chains are often treated separately from their mainland countries.

Confirmation

The confirmation system is the key to the entire DXing community. When somebody listens to a DX broadcast, they then complete a SINPO report. SINPO stands for:

S – Signal strength
I – Interference with other stations or broadcasters
N – Noise ratio in the received signal
P – Propagation (ups and downs of the reception)
O – Overall merit

source: Wikipedia

The report rates each one of these categories on a scale of 1 to 5 with 5 being the best quality. The frequency on which the broadcast was heard is listed along with the type of equipment used, a description of the program, and any suggestions the listener wants to list. It is then labeled with longitude and latitude coordinates for the location received and either mailed or emailed to the broadcaster.

The other side of this transaction is the broadcaster sending back verification that they made the broadcast described. This is called a QSL form and typically has the broadcast information on one side and a picture on the other. These are the real collector’s items for the DXing community, so the pictures often show the landscape or culture of the area from which they came. Both parties have to take the initiative to do their part for this process to work properly. This relationship between broadcaster and recipient allows both parties to get better at sending and receiving signals over long distances.

Importance

So besides being interesting and fun, why is this practice important? Many people consider DXing to be a backup system for long distance communication when satellite communication goes down. This scenario could be caused by hackers taking control of our satellite systems. It could also be caused by solar storms or debris doing mechanical damage to the satellites themselves. In any of these situations, long distance communication could remain to be essential.

The importance of this form of communication extends to several potential SHTF scenarios. There are plenty of ways that cellular and internet communications could be shut down. Most cellular towers require a power source. That means that communications could be down even if you have a generator to keep your phone charged. Flooding like we saw with hurricane Katrina or Sandy could wipe out communication. During Katrina the majority of people who were able to communicate were using HAM radios.

The fact that DXing can allow you to receive transmissions from other countries is key to its importance. If the US was attacked, it is likely that communications would be shut down. By receiving foreign transmissions DXers may be able to keep up with the news. Any information you can get in a situation like that would be absolutely vital.

Another benefit of this type of communication is that the equipment can be built. One of the ways we could be attacked would be an EMP (electromagnetic pulse) blast which would wipe out almost all electronic devices. Cell towers would be destroyed, so any way to communicate would have to be built. With just a quick stop at a radio shack or digging through your garage you could build a device to send or receive long distance transmissions.

In the end, any alternative form of communication is a good idea. The fact that this form can span hundreds or even thousands of miles makes it that much more valuable. DXing is a simple yet challenging form of radio transmission that does not require a license. Anybody on any budget can participate and hone their skills. There is also a strong DXing community, so learning from others is quite easy. If you want to get into radio communication as a hobby, this may be a good way to get your feet wet.

The post DXing and Why It Is Important appeared first on Survival Sullivan.

Comment on Creating an At-Work Emergency Bag by John

This is a topic i consider alot. I always have my fully loaded 10 day pack at my house ready to go. but what if i cant get to it
Through reading this it helped shed some light on how i might build up my work to home BOB.

A few items i thought of while reading this. i know things like this where over looked due to this article being related to disasters but i was thinking on it and i think this would be a good kit for personal defense items tazer and baton they are both light and if anything did occur they can be worn on your belt saving space in you bag for anything you may find on the way

Comment on Seven Tips for a Smart and Healthy Victory Garden by Thoughts About Prepping from an Ole Fart | | disasterdefense.us

[…] Everything we ate had to be grown and preserved off the farm, during the summer. All repairs had to be done on sight, using material at hand, because a trip to town was a half day affair. The closest farm machinery dealer was 9 miles away in Palouse, Washington. I have a degree in Architecture from the University of Idaho; although I spent all of my work life as a test technician in research and development, working for a major truck manufacturer. […]

Tor 0.2.8.8 is released, with important fixes

Tor 0.2.8.8 fixes two crash bugs present in previous versions of the 0.2.8.x series. Relays running 0.2.8.x should upgrade, as should users who select public relays as their bridges.

You can download the source from the Tor website. Packages should be available over the next week or so.

Below is a list of changes since 0.2.8.6.

Changes in version 0.2.8.8 - 2016-09-23

  • Major bugfixes (crash):
    • Fix a complicated crash bug that could affect Tor clients configured to use bridges when replacing a networkstatus consensus in which one of their bridges was mentioned. OpenBSD users saw more crashes here, but all platforms were potentially affected. Fixes bug 20103; bugfix on 0.2.8.2-alpha.
  • Major bugfixes (relay, OOM handler):
    • Fix a timing-dependent assertion failure that could occur when we tried to flush from a circuit after having freed its cells because of an out-of-memory condition. Fixes bug 20203; bugfix on 0.2.8.1-alpha. Thanks to "cypherpunks" for help diagnosing this one.
  • Minor feature (fallback directories):
    • Remove broken fallbacks from the hard-coded fallback directory list. Closes ticket 20190; patch by teor.
  • Minor features (geoip):
    • Update geoip and geoip6 to the September 6 2016 Maxmind GeoLite2 Country database.

Tor 0.2.9.3-alpha is released, with important fixes

Tor 0.2.9.3-alpha adds improved support for entities that want to make high-performance services available through the Tor .onion mechanism without themselves receiving anonymity as they host those services. It also tries harder to ensure that all steps on a circuit are using the strongest crypto possible, strengthens some TLS properties, and resolves several bugs -- including a pair of crash bugs from the 0.2.8 series. Anybody running an earlier version of 0.2.9.x should upgrade.

You can download the source from the usual place on the website. Packages should be available over the next several days. Remember to check the signatures!

Please note: This is an alpha release. You should only try this one if you are interested in tracking Tor development, testing new features, making sure that Tor still builds on unusual platforms, or generally trying to hunt down bugs. If you want a stable experience, please stick to the stable releases.

Below are the changes since 0.2.9.2-alpha.

Changes in version 0.2.9.3-alpha - 2016-09-23

  • Major bugfixes (crash, also in 0.2.8.8):
    • Fix a complicated crash bug that could affect Tor clients configured to use bridges when replacing a networkstatus consensus in which one of their bridges was mentioned. OpenBSD users saw more crashes here, but all platforms were potentially affected. Fixes bug 20103; bugfix on 0.2.8.2-alpha.
  • Major bugfixes (relay, OOM handler, also in 0.2.8.8):
    • Fix a timing-dependent assertion failure that could occur when we tried to flush from a circuit after having freed its cells because of an out-of-memory condition. Fixes bug 20203; bugfix on 0.2.8.1-alpha. Thanks to "cypherpunks" for help diagnosing this one.

 

  • Major features (circuit building, security):
    • Authorities, relays and clients now require ntor keys in all descriptors, for all hops (except for rare hidden service protocol cases), for all circuits, and for all other roles. Part of ticket 19163.
    • Tor authorities, relays, and clients only use ntor, except for rare cases in the hidden service protocol. Part of ticket 19163.
  • Major features (single-hop "hidden" services):
    • Add experimental HiddenServiceSingleHopMode and HiddenServiceNonAnonymousMode options. When both are set to 1, every hidden service on a Tor instance becomes a non-anonymous Single Onion Service. Single Onions make one-hop (direct) connections to their introduction and renzedvous points. One-hop circuits make Single Onion servers easily locatable, but clients remain location-anonymous. This is compatible with the existing hidden service implementation, and works on the current tor network without any changes to older relays or clients. Implements proposal 260, completes ticket 17178. Patch by teor and asn.
  • Major features (resource management):
    • Tor can now notice it is about to run out of sockets, and preemptively close connections of lower priority. (This feature is off by default for now, since the current prioritizing method is yet not mature enough. You can enable it by setting "DisableOOSCheck 0", but watch out: it might close some sockets you would rather have it keep.) Closes ticket 18640.
  • Major bugfixes (circuit building):
    • Hidden service client-to-intro-point and service-to-rendezvous- point cicruits use the TAP key supplied by the protocol, to avoid epistemic attacks. Fixes bug 19163; bugfix on 0.2.4.18-rc.
  • Major bugfixes (compilation, OpenBSD):
    • Fix a Libevent-detection bug in our autoconf script that would prevent Tor from linking successfully on OpenBSD. Patch from rubiate. Fixes bug 19902; bugfix on 0.2.9.1-alpha.
  • Major bugfixes (hidden services):
    • Clients now require hidden services to include the TAP keys for their intro points in the hidden service descriptor. This prevents an inadvertent upgrade to ntor, which a malicious hidden service could use to distinguish clients by consensus version. Fixes bug 20012; bugfix on 0.2.4.8-alpha. Patch by teor.
  • Minor features (security, TLS):
    • Servers no longer support clients that without AES ciphersuites. (3DES is no longer considered an acceptable cipher.) We believe that no such Tor clients currently exist, since Tor has required OpenSSL 0.9.7 or later since 2009. Closes ticket 19998.
  • Minor feature (fallback directories):
    • Remove broken entries from the hard-coded fallback directory list. Closes ticket 20190; patch by teor.
  • Minor features (geoip, also in 0.2.8.8):
    • Update geoip and geoip6 to the September 6 2016 Maxmind GeoLite2 Country database.
  • Minor feature (port flags):
    • Add new flags to the *Port options to finer control over which requests are allowed. The flags are NoDNSRequest, NoOnionTraffic, and the synthetic flag OnionTrafficOnly, which is equivalent to NoDNSRequest, NoIPv4Traffic, and NoIPv6Traffic. Closes enhancement 18693; patch by "teor".
  • Minor features (directory authority):
    • After voting, if the authorities decide that a relay is not "Valid", they no longer include it in the consensus at all. Closes ticket 20002; implements part of proposal 272.
  • Minor features (testing):
    • Disable memory protections on OpenBSD when performing our unit tests for memwipe(). The test deliberately invokes undefined behavior, and the OpenBSD protections interfere with this. Patch from "rubiate". Closes ticket 20066.
  • Minor features (testing, ipv6):
    • Add the single-onion and single-onion-ipv6 chutney targets to "make test-network-all". This requires a recent chutney version with the single onion network flavours (git c72a652 or later). Closes ticket 20072; patch by teor.
    • Add the hs-ipv6 chutney target to make test-network-all's IPv6 tests. Remove bridges+hs, as it's somewhat redundant. This requires a recent chutney version that supports IPv6 clients, relays, and authorities. Closes ticket 20069; patch by teor.
  • Minor features (Tor2web):
    • Make Tor2web clients respect ReachableAddresses. This feature was inadvertently enabled in 0.2.8.6, then removed by bugfix 19973 on 0.2.8.7. Implements feature 20034. Patch by teor.
  • Minor features (unit tests):
    • We've done significant work to make the unit tests run faster.
    • Our link-handshake unit tests now check that when invalid handshakes fail, they fail with the error messages we expected.
    • Our unit testing code that captures log messages no longer prevents them from being written out if the user asked for them (by passing --debug or --info or or --notice --warn to the "test" binary). This change prevents us from missing unexpected log messages simply because we were looking for others. Related to ticket 19999.
    • The unit tests now log all warning messages with the "BUG" flag. Previously, they only logged errors by default. This change will help us make our testing code more correct, and make sure that we only hit this code when we mean to. In the meantime, however, there will be more warnings in the unit test logs than before. This is preparatory work for ticket 19999.
    • The unit tests now treat any failure of a "tor_assert_nonfatal()" assertion as a test failure.
  • Minor bug fixes (circuits):
    • Use the CircuitBuildTimeout option whenever LearnCircuitBuildTimeout is disabled. Previously, we would respect the option when a user disabled it, but not when it was disabled because some other option was set. Fixes bug 20073; bugfix on 0.2.4.12-alpha. Patch by teor.
  • Minor bugfixes (allocation):
    • Change how we allocate memory for large chunks on buffers, to avoid a (currently impossible) integer overflow, and to waste less space when allocating unusually large chunks. Fixes bug 20081; bugfix on 0.2.0.16-alpha. Issue identified by Guido Vranken.
    • Always include orconfig.h before including any other C headers. Sometimes, it includes macros that affect the behavior of the standard headers. Fixes bug 19767; bugfix on 0.2.9.1-alpha (the first version to use AC_USE_SYSTEM_EXTENSIONS).
    • Fix a syntax error in the IF_BUG_ONCE__() macro in non-GCC- compatible compilers. Fixes bug 20141; bugfix on 0.2.9.1-alpha. Patch from Gisle Vanem.
    • Stop trying to build with Clang 4.0's -Wthread-safety warnings. They apparently require a set of annotations that we aren't currently using, and they create false positives in our pthreads wrappers. Fixes bug 20110; bugfix on 0.2.9.1-alpha.
  • Minor bugfixes (directory authority):
    • Die with a more useful error when the operator forgets to place the authority_signing_key file into the keys directory. This avoids an uninformative assert & traceback about having an invalid key. Fixes bug 20065; bugfix on 0.2.0.1-alpha.
    • When allowing private addresses, mark Exits that only exit to private locations as such. Fixes bug 20064; bugfix on 0.2.2.9-alpha.
  • Minor bugfixes (documentation):
    • Document the default PathsNeededToBuildCircuits value that's used by clients when the directory authorities don't set min_paths_for_circs_pct. Fixes bug 20117; bugfix on 02c320916e02 in tor-0.2.4.10-alpha. Patch by teor, reported by Jesse V.
    • Fix manual for the User option: it takes a username, not a UID. Fixes bug 19122; bugfix on 0.0.2pre16 (the first version to have a manpage!).
  • Minor bugfixes (hidden services):
    • Stop logging intro point details to the client log on certain error conditions. Fixed as part of bug 20012; bugfix on 0.2.4.8-alpha. Patch by teor.
  • Minor bugfixes (IPv6, testing):
    • Check for IPv6 correctly on Linux when running test networks. Fixes bug 19905; bugfix on 0.2.7.3-rc; patch by teor.
  • Minor bugfixes (Linux seccomp2 sandbox):
    • Add permission to run the sched_yield() and sigaltstack() system calls, in order to support versions of Tor compiled with asan or ubsan code that use these calls. Now "sandbox 1" and "--enable-expensive-hardening" should be compatible on more systems. Fixes bug 20063; bugfix on 0.2.5.1-alpha.
  • Minor bugfixes (logging):
    • When logging a message from the BUG() macro, be explicit about what we were asserting. Previously we were confusing what we were asserting with what the bug was. Fixes bug 20093; bugfix on 0.2.9.1-alpha.
    • When we are unable to remove the bw_accounting file, do not warn if the reason we couldn't remove it was that it didn't exist. Fixes bug 19964; bugfix on 0.2.5.4-alpha. Patch from 'pastly'.
  • Minor bugfixes (option parsing):
    • Count unix sockets when counting client listeners (SOCKS, Trans, NATD, and DNS). This has no user-visible behaviour changes: these options are set once, and never read. Required for correct behaviour in ticket 17178. Fixes bug 19677; bugfix on 0.2.6.3-alpha. Patch by teor.
  • Minor bugfixes (options):
    • Check the consistency of UseEntryGuards and EntryNodes more reliably. Fixes bug 20074; bugfix on tor- 0.2.4.12-alpha. Patch by teor.
    • Stop changing the configured value of UseEntryGuards on authorities and Tor2web clients. Fixes bug 20074; bugfix on commits 51fc6799 in tor-0.1.1.16-rc and acda1735 in tor-0.2.4.3- alpha. Patch by teor.
  • Minor bugfixes (Tor2web):
    • Prevent Tor2web clients running hidden services, these services are not anonymous due to the one-hop client paths. Fixes bug 19678. Patch by teor.
  • Minor bugfixes (unit tests):
    • Fix a shared-random unit test that was failing on big endian architectures due to internal representation of a integer copied to a buffer. The test is changed to take a full 32 bytes of data and use the output of a python script that make the COMMIT and REVEAL calculation according to the spec. Fixes bug 19977; bugfix on 0.2.9.1-alpha.
    • The tor_tls_server_info_callback unit test no longer crashes when debug-level logging is turned on. Fixes bug 20041; bugfix on 0.2.8.1-alpha.

Growing Mushrooms In A Laundry Basket

Growing Mushrooms In A Laundry Basket Grow mushrooms with a basket and some straw and have them literally coming out of your ears. Thought you might like to see a great way to grow mushrooms outdoors if you have a shady place that gets watered regularly… Great for an emergency food source or just save money at …

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57 Bug Out Bag Gear Ideas You May Not Have Thought Of

57 Bug Out Bag Gear Ideas You May Not Have Thought Of Have you thought of everything for your bug out bag? This article will almost definitely give you at least one idea of what you should have in your bug out bag that you haven’t though of yet. Obviously, you need to have some …

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The post 57 Bug Out Bag Gear Ideas You May Not Have Thought Of appeared first on SHTF & Prepping Central.

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